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A good Flash day November 22, 2006

Posted by rockysays in Flash, niceness, inspiration, web 2.0, web design.
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kuler.jpg

I’ve come across some lovely Flash content today. First up is kuler from Adobe Labs, which essentially enables users to share colour themes. So in Web 2.0 terms, I suppose you could call it Social Swatching.

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Next up is PICTAPS from ROXIC. Whilst you could argue that the site is essentially useless, it’s a lovely way to pass some time, and is pretty damn impressive in technical terms. Basically, you create a 2D sketch, which is then animated in a lovely 3D environment. And, er, that’s it. So yeah, useless, but very cool

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Aptana – The Web IDE July 31, 2006

Posted by rockysays in general, hmm...interesting, news, web 2.0, web design, Web Programming.
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Aptana - The Web IDE
This looks interesting; a free, open source, cross-platform Web Development app. I’ll be downloading it and trying it out over the next few days, so I’ll be sure to report back on how I get on

Ultimate Web Developer List July 17, 2006

Posted by rockysays in general, Links, web 2.0, web design, Web Programming.
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Loads of good CSS links, cheat sheets and other stuff

Jonathan Harris is a genius May 31, 2006

Posted by rockysays in general, niceness, inspiration, web 2.0, web design.
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wefeelfine1.gif
Jonathan Harris, the creator of 10×10 and other lovely things, has teamed up with Sepandar Kamvar of Google to create We Feel Fine, "an exploration of human emotion, in six movements". Fantastic.

Ted Nelson, Information Technology Pioneer May 10, 2006

Posted by rockysays in general, hmm...interesting, niceness, inspiration, web 2.0, web design, Web Programming.
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Ted Nelson
Last night I went to the Inaugural Roy Stringer Lecture at FACT in Liverpool. The lecture was given by Ted Nelson, founder of the Xanadu project and the man who coined the term "hypertext".

It was certainly an interesting evening; Ted stated that interactive software is "a branch of movie making", in the sense that both media consist of "events on the screen that affect the heart and mind of the viewer". Expanding on this he compared the OS GUIs of Mac and Windows systems, describing Steve Jobs as a very good movie director, and Bill Gates as a traffic cop. He suggested that anyone in the field of creating & developing interactive software should not study C# and CSS, but should instead look to the work of Orson Welles and Walt Disney (perhaps not too surprising, considering the apparent disdain he has for 'techies').

Naturally, he discussed the Xanadu project at length and the concept of transclusion (what a great word). As impressive as his idealism was though, you just can't ignore the fact that it's Tim Berners-Lee's vision that has brought the Internet into mainstream, everyday use, and not Ted Nelson's.

He's got a point about Bill Gates though. 

Learn CSS positioning in Ten Steps March 31, 2006

Posted by rockysays in web 2.0, web design, Web Programming.
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If you don't know your floats from your relatives, this tutorial is for you

Lightbox JS v2.0 March 30, 2006

Posted by rockysays in web 2.0, web design, Web Programming.
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Following on from yesterday's nice, simple CSS image gallery comes something a bit more sophisticated; Lokesh Dakar's Lightbox JS v2.0. Very swish

Excellent CSS image gallery March 29, 2006

Posted by rockysays in general, niceness, inspiration, web 2.0, web design, Web Programming.
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A super light-weight (8kb) image gallery that uses nothing but CSS. Very nice.

20 rules of smart and successful web development March 21, 2006

Posted by rockysays in general, web 2.0, web design, Web Programming.
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An interesting read, although I’d call them guidelines rather than rules; it is only one person’s opinion, after all.

A new media ecology March 6, 2006

Posted by rockysays in hmm...interesting, news, web 2.0.
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Yesterday’s Observer featured an article by John Naughton on the switch from “push” media to “pull” media – and how this figures in our “media ecology”